Wednesday, August 8, 2007

Seven steps to Huge Loops


Looping
is really big fun and the newest playboat designs have made this once elite maneuver attainable and within reach of aspiring playboaters everywhere. Loops may be performed in virtually any type of hole or wave-hole. Here are seven steps to get you looping like a rockstar. Remember, the best way to learn is to practice by getting out to your local playspot and going for it. Oh yeah, make sure its deep!


Step 1- Lining up at top of pile

1) Begin at the top of the pile


Step 2- Shift body

2) Shift your body weight to the back of your seat by bending slightly from the hips.


3. Accelerate down the face of the feature

3) Accelerate down the face of the wave or wave hole, making sure to keep your boat angle perpendicular to the incoming greenwater. At this time shift your weight rapidly to the front of your boat by bending forward at the hips and forcing your heels down.


4. Jump up

4) This will cause your boat to “initiate” in the greenwater upstream of the hole. As you feel your boat start to pop or ender out of the water jump straight up as quickly as possible. Tip: As you jump look up at the sky


5. The Snap around

5) As soon as you are standing, snap back forward bringing your chest towards the front of your cockpit while trying to throw your heels over your head like a forward somersault.

6. Use your paddle to help bring the boat around

6) As the front of your boat passes over your head pull back on your paddle to help it along.


7. Finish the maneuver with a forward stroke

7) Finish by sitting up straight with a recovery forward stroke!

Cheers and happy looping!

Be Safe

Andrew Holcombe

1 comment:

dave johnson said...

watching people looping is such an impressive move but it looks rather complicated . now after reading your"seven simple steps" im even more confused i can flatwater cartwheel my chronic with ease and bow and stern stall but trying to loop i just keep falling flat on my face? any ideas . . . . . in simple form ;-p
cheers